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Remarks of the Spokesperson of the Chinese Embassy in Canada on the so called issue of China's Dumping of Steel into Canada
2018/03/16

Some Canadian friends asked for the comment of the Chinese Embassy in Canada on the latest accusations of the so called China’s dumping of steel into Canada’s market. The following is the reply of the spokesperson of the Chinese Embassy:

Recently, U.S. President Donald Trump announced hefty tariffs on steel and aluminum imports, with Canada to be the first country to bear the brunt. Enraged, people from different walks of life in Canada criticized that the United States’ decision was trade protectionism and would severely damage the interest of Canada. They demanded that the United States change its mind or face Canada’s retaliation. And then the U.S. government proclaimed a temporary exemption from the tariffs for Canada, which made Canadians breathe easier. However, the moment they felt relieved from outside pressure, some Canadians turned their guns on China, saying that  “China is a problem”, and immediate action must be taken to prevent China from “dumping” steel into Canadian market, and from using Canada as a “backdoor” to bring Chinese steel into America. They believe that Canada should be harsher in its dealing with China or it will be perceived by the U.S. as “not helping this thing”.

According to international media, China is the “major target” of President Trump’s steel and aluminum tariffs. China is the victim of trade protectionism, but is seen as a “bad offender” and attacked by some Canadians. Did China really dump steel into Canada? According to Statistics Canada, Canada imported U$ 9.55 billion of steel from all over the world in 2017, of which about U$ 940 million were imported from China, accounting for only 9.8% of the total, but about U$ 5.58 billion were imported from the U.S., accounting for 58.4% of the total. Canadian statistics also show that China's steel exports to Canada decreased significantly in 2015 and 2016 and picked up only in 2017. According to reports by Canadian media, Canada’s steel export to the U.S. accounts for 17% of U.S. steel import every year, ranking the most. If 9.8% is dumping, what is 58.4% or 17%? We understand Canada’s pressing feelings to avoid the US trade sanctions, but it is not right to drop stones on someone who has fallen into a well, or even push others to the front as a bullet shield.

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